Sunday, March 24, 2019

Pets & Friends




"Ferdinand Schladitz photographed by Caren Detje and styled by Julia May-Yen, in exclusive for Fucking Young! Online.

Concept & Art Direction: Julia May-Yen Wu & Caren Detje
Producer: Karl Leon
BRANDS: Joseph, Won Hundred, Paul Smith, Puma, Hund Hund, Samsøe & Samsøe, Club Monaco, Hien Le." - Fuckingyoung.es












Saturday, March 23, 2019

MODEL CITIZEN: JOAO KNORR




MMSCENE Spring 2019 Issue cover star JOAO KNORR sits down with our Editor ANA MARKOVIC to talk about his beginnings, working with Tom Ford and Donatella Versace and his downtime. Accompanying Joao’s interview is exclusive shoot by ROBIN NAVARRO HARRAGA featuring styling from LES HOMMES Spring Summer 2019 collection.

OUT NOW IN PRINT $24.90 & DIGITAL $4.90



Who is João Knorr?
I’m a eighteen-year-old model from Panambi, Brazil. I love playing tennis, hanging out with friends at the beach and enjoy traveling and learning all about different cultures from around the world.

How were you discovered?
I was discovered while playing at my beach volleyball championship game. An agent on the beach scouted me and it all started from there. The rest is history.

Your career skyrocketed last year. Were you prepared for it?
No, I was not expecting it at all. I worked very hard last year and I am extremely dedicated to my job, so I’m very grateful it’s paid off thus far.

Last season you landed two major campaigns – Versace and Tom Ford. I have to ask how was it working with Donatella Versace and Tom Ford? Do you have any anecdotes from the shoots that you could share with our readers?
Working with Donatella Versace and Tom Ford was a dream come true for me. It was an absolute honor and pleasure to work with two such incredible forces in fashion. On
set, Donatella gave me some great advice about the industry, “Stay humble, stay kind and keep working hard.”

After Versace and Tom Ford, what is your next dream modeling job?
Landing a fragrance deal! Maybe with Tom Ford, Saint Laurent, Versace or something.



What do you enjoy most about modeling, and what do you dislike?
I love the fact that I get to travel and see the world with what I do! Working with industry legends such as Steven Meisel, Donatella Versace, Tom Ford and so many great creatives. The downside of the industry is that with my constant travels, I don’t get to see my family and friends very often. I miss them all so much!

Best runway experience so far?
It has to be getting to open the Versace Fall Winter 2018 runway show.

Brazil always had amazing models. What do you think makes Brazilian girls and guys stand out?
I’m not sure what exactly makes us stand out to be honest with you… People tell me all the time “Brazilians are so exotic!” Maybe we are!

Who are your favorite supermodels?
Naomi Campbell, Gisele Bündchen and Shalom Harlow.

How would you describe your style?
Typical street-style with a flare of athleisure.

What do you like to do when you’re not modeling, and if you hadn’t become a model, what would you be doing instead?
I like hanging out with my friends, going to the beach, and playing sports. If I hadn’t become a model, I think I would have loved to become a professional tennis player.



What’s your favorite tv show to binge watch?
My favourite show I could binge watch any time is definitely South Park!

What is the best piece of advice you have ever received?
Just to be yourself!

Your tip for taking the best photo?
Be in the moment, have fun and be confident in yourself!

What makes you happy?
Music, I love the way any genre of music can compliment my mood, happy or sad. My family and friends are what make me the happiest though.

Keep up with Joao on Instagram @joaoknorr

Model Joao Knorr at Next Models Paris – @nextmodelsparis
Photography by Robin Navarro Harraga – @robin_n.h_
Styling by Julien Mazzoli – @julienmazzoli
Grooming by Sabrina Iddout at Backstage Agency – @backstageagencyparis." - Malemodelscene.net




Marlon Teixeira is the Face of Calibre Fall Winter 2019 Collection



"Australian menswear brand Calibre enlists supermodel Marlon Teixeira to star in their Fall Winter 2019 advertising campaign captured by fashion photographer Steven Chee.

Discover more of the campaign below:" - Malemodelscene.net



Jordan Barrett Stars in GQ Style Russia Spring Summer 2019 Cover Story




"Supermodel Jordan Barrett takes the cover story of Russian GQ Style Magazine‘s Spring Summer 2019 edition captured by fashion photographer Ivan Bideac. In charge of styling was Seppe Tirabassi, with beauty from hair stylist Matthew Tuozzoli at See Management." - Malemodelscene.net





Loewe “DUMBO” Capsule Collection



"On 29 March, LOEWE will launch the Dumbo capsule collection in selected stores for a limited period only.

Taking inspiration from the iconic Disney character, Dumbo the Elephant, the capsule is an exclusive extension of the Spring/Summer 2019 collection. This limited line of products builds on the positive nostalgia that the lovable Disney cartoon conjures in everyone’s mind. Dumbo, the young elephant whose oversized ears enabled him to fly, became an intrinsic part of childhood for subsequent generations since he first took flight in 1941." -Fuckingyoung.es



Friday, March 22, 2019

Ibibio Sound Machine's Stellar Single "Wanna Come Down" Is Here!




In just one week, we shall have the pleasure and opportunity to shake a tailfeather with thee eclectic and sonically ethereal Ibibio Sound Machine! Thee Brit electronic afro-funk pop group hailing from London featuring standout songstress Eno Williams, have unleashed a yummy sunny far-out dance ditty entitled, "Wanna Come Down".

Thee brand spankin' new tune follows the recent press release of the soon to be released third album "Doko Mien". Set for a March 22nd release, Ibibio Sound Machine have another sunkist, dance hall floor ready jam with the groovy “Wanna Come Down.”

Eno Williams spilled the tea about the song’s concept: “The Ibibio lyrics of the track are about the healing power of the river, and the chorus, ‘Wanna come down to see you, get ready cos we’re gonna go’ is inviting people to come, dance, and get involved with what’s going on.”

Here at headquarters, we have so much ecstatic anticipation to see this phenomenal band come Mar 28 at LA's Teragram Ballroom!

Without further ado, get into your happy feet boots and feel the speakerphone invade your bloodstream with the latest ItsNotYouItsMe hit parade "Wanna Come Down" featuring thee incomparable Ibibio Sound Machine.








Ibibio Sound Machine on tour:
Mar 05 Brighton, UK – Concorde 2
Mar 09 Bristol, UK – Colston Hall
Mar 13 London, UK – 100 Club [SOLD OUT]
Mar 14 London, UK – 100 Club
Mar 15 Manchester, UK – YES
Mar 16 Manchester, UK – YES
Mar 18 Washington, DC – U Street Music Hall
Mar 20 New York, NY – Brooklyn Bowl
Mar 22 Montreal, QC – L’Astral
Mar 23 Toronto, ON – Mod Club
Mar 25 Chicago, IL – Lincoln Hall
Mar 27 Oakland, CA – New Parish
Mar 28 Los Angeles, CA – Teragram Ballroom
May 04 Leeds, UK – Live at Leeds
May 05 Leicester, UK – Handmade
May 24 London, UK – All Points East

The Number Ones: Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition”


According to one of our musical sources:

Stevie Wonder – “Superstition”

HIT #1: January 27, 1973

STAYED AT #1: 1 week

When Stevie Wonder turned 21, he took on the Motown machine, and he won. Wonder was an 11-year-old child prodigy when he signed with Motown. At that time, the deal was that Motown would put all of Wonder’s earnings in a trust, and he wouldn’t get control of that trust until he turned 21. In the meantime, Motown would pay him a tiny weekly stipend and pay for his tutor. And for a full decade, Wonder worked as a cog within the Motown machine, cranking out singles written by, or co-written with, the in-house songwriters. That approach worked for a while, but it couldn’t contain Stevie Wonder.

Wonder first hit #1 with the electric 1963 live single “Fingertips (Pt. II).” Throughout the rest of the ’60s, he never got back to the #1 spot, but he landed in the top 10 again and again. And during that time, he grew. He learned more instruments. He started writing and producing his own records. He got married. And then he turned 21. Once he hit that birthday, his contract with Motown was up. All of a sudden, he had leverage. He used it.

When Stevie Wonder re-signed with Motown, he had a new set of demands. He wanted complete artistic control, which would effectively free him up to stop working in the Motown hit factory. He also wanted his own publishing, and he wanted a better royalty rate. He got everything he wanted. Motown bet on Wonder. This turned out to be a smart idea. During the ’70s, in quick succession, Stevie Wonder cranked out Where I’m Coming From, Music Of My Mind, Talking Book, Innervisions, Fulfillingness’ First Finale, and Songs In The Key Of Life. He won Album Of The Year Grammys in 1974, 1975, and 1977. (When Paul Simon won the award in 1976, he thanked Stevie Wonder for not releasing an album that year.) And when Wonder stopped focusing on making big singles, his singles suddenly got bigger. In 1973, a 22-year-old Stevie Wonder returned to the #1 spot on the Hot 100 for the first time in nearly a decade.




“Superstition,” the song that returned Wonder to chart supremacy, could’ve been a Jeff Beck song. Beck, the UK blues-rock guitar wizard, admired Wonder’s music, and he wanted to work with him. So they came up with a deal: Beck would come in and play some guitar on Wonder’s album if Wonder would write a song for him. One day, Wonder and Beck were fooling around in the studio, and Beck started playing a beat on the drums. Wonder told him to keep doing it, and then he began improvising on a Hohner Clavinet, a sort of electronic harpsichord that would let you phase back and forth. That’s when Wonder came up with the “Superstition” riff and some of the song’s lyrics. That day, Wonder and Beck recorded a demo of “Superstition,” and Beck was all set to cover it and release it as a single. But Berry Gordy was not going to let that happen.

Wonder might’ve won creative control of his albums when he negotiated his new Motown deal, but his Motown bosses still got to choose which of his songs could become singles. Berry Gordy knew “Superstition” was a hit. Meanwhile, the debut album from Beck’s new group, a power trio that also featured former Vanilla Fudge members Tim Bogert and Carmine Appice, got delayed. Beck, Bogert & Appice eventually did release their “Superstition” cover, but it came out after Wonder’s version was already a hit. Beck was crushed about that, and he grumbled about it in the press. But the song was never Jeff Beck’s. He was just lucky to be there when Stevie Wonder put the pieces together. (Beck’s guitar only made it onto one of the songs from Wonder’s Talking Book album.) And though Beck’s “Superstition” cover is cool, it has nothing on the original.




Wonder didn’t just write and co-produce “Superstition”; he played every instrument on the song except the horns. The monstrously funky Clavinet riff was so complicated that nobody else could figure out how to play it, and years later, it came out that it was really eight different Clavinet parts edited together. And yet it sounds intuitive, like a guitar riff.

“Superstition” came out after Wonder had spent much of 1972 on tour with the Rolling Stones. (The Stones had opened for Wonder back in 1964, when he was a child phenom and they’d only just arrived on the scene.) And maybe it’s not an accident that Wonder came up with the riff with Beck in mind. It’s a huge, nasty stomper of a song, one that has as much in common with the Stones or Led Zeppelin as it does with Wonder’s Motown contemporaries.

And yet “Superstition” is still a soul song, with its perfectly timed horn stabs and its squechy low end. Wonder sings hard on it, too, hitting pinched and churchy high notes that swoop in over the churn he’s generated. The lyrics are gnomic opacities: “13-month-old baby broke the looking glass / Seven years of bad luck / The good things in your past.” But there’s a concrete meaning to the song. Wonder is singing about how we shouldn’t believe passed-down wisdom: “When you believe in things that you don’t understand, then you suffer / Superstition ain’t the way.” Maybe that’s an oblique critique of racism, or conservative policy, or any other handed-down hang-up. But Wonder was already singing in riddles. And ultimately, the lyrics mattered a whole lot less than that earthshaking groove.

Wonder was, and is, famous for being an absolutely electric, transformative live performer. We can hear that as early as “Fingertips (Pt. II),” and we can see it for ourselves everytime he plays live now. But “Superstition” is something that Wonder put together in a studio, playing around with synthesizers — the Clavinet, the Moog bass — and using the studio as an instrument. And maybe the coolest thing about it is that he still makes it sound like a sweaty, intense live performance.



GRADE: 10/10

BONUS BEATS: Here’s Stevie Wonder playing a wild seven-minute version of “Superstition” live on a 1973 episode of Sesame Street, for an audience of little kids:




BONUS BONUS BEATS: Here’s the “Superstition” cover that Yesterday’s New Quintet, Madlib’s instrumental jazz-funk project, included on the 2004 Stevie Wonder tribute album Stevie:" -Stereogum.com



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